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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
change and casting doubt on the science of climate change cost him dearly today. new york's independent mayor mike bloomberg endorsed president obama referring both to hurricane irene last august and sandy this week. bloomberg wrote and i quote "in just 14 months, two hurricanes have forced us to evacuate nakeds, something our city had -- never done before. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." for more, we have on the phone -- what's going on to get to millions of commuters to work tomorrow, i'm joined by phone by metropolitan transportation spokesman aaron donovan. thanks for joining us. >> thanks, governor, you bet. >> eliot: we know you've begun to get some of the subways above 34th and 42nd street moving again. what will be open tomorrow and then if you could, give us an update on the tunnels which seem to be the major impediment to expanding traffic. >> well, at this point in time, our subway system is essentially cut in half. we have some service
code word for climate science for it stop funding climate science. romney himself says there is no scientific consensus so we should support more debate and investigation within the scientific community, except no action but to make problems worse. what about democrats? they conceded there is a problem and advocate that we work toward a problem -- program to set limits with other emerging powers. but that's it. no action. in fact, obama has emphasized, we have to work hard to gain when because 100 years of energy independence by exploiting domestic or canadian resources by fracking and other elaborate technologies. it does not ask what the world would look like in 100 years. so there are differences. the differences are, basically, about how enthusiastically the lemmings' should march toward the cliff. [laughter] the second major issue, nuclear war. it is also on the front pages daily. but in a way that was seem outlandish to some independent and fervoobserver. it does seem outrageous to many around the world. the current threat, not for the first time, is in the middle
in science, technology, engineering and math. what would you suggest be done to produce more graduates in those areas? >> moderator: this will go first to mr. howell. howell: this is right up my alley, val. i love technology. i think this is the greatest thing. we have to start in preschool. we have to emphasize that science, technology, engineering, math are key to growing our economy. but i'd also add in the a word, and that's art. you know, at ibm some of our very finest software developers that create the apps that we all use are very, very culturally-aware, and they're the artsy ones. but they take the science and technology. we've got to invest in beginning in preschool and going all the way through k-12. from the federal government, no child left behind left everyone behind. we need to take those dollars and reinvest them back into our education system near utah today. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: there's a lot of what scott said here is true, and i appreciate him saying it. and we in utah are known for one of the best software valleys in the country. i'm the republican h
in the science. the science of climate change does not consider the sun. the sun is very potent, a very potent aspect of our climate. that is the problem. the sun travels around the black hole in the center of the galaxy and it takes millions of years. each part of this journey has a different results. host: here's more images for you from the newspapers this morning on the aftermath of this storm. here is the new york post, freight in a storm for travelers shows a picture -- franenstorm. and here is the new york post with images of a fleet of the taxicabs sittings of march and a parking lot yesterday in hoboken, new jersey. and the front page of the new trailpost, frankenstorm's of ruin and despair. any despair in queens yesterday. in sacramento, calif., on our line for democrats, go ahead. . caller: i go back to a comment made by one of the candidates. this was an regard to a woman [indiscernible] i was wondering if the same person would think it is an act of god also. thank you. host: that was wesley in sacramento. let me give the political articles before we conclude here. this is the fron
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
systems to integrate social media and data visualization tools with social science, analysis. his writing has appeared in the asian "wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organizations around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here in gaston hall, dr. kim. [applause] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of co
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
of the energy sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was designed to suppress certain votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. the right thing to do is to show photo i
for it. we should recruits 100,000 map and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our atmosphere, that will ma
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. host: do you want to respond? guest: they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. and homeland security. the right thing to d
social media and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his write ago peer in the asian "the wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organization around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here dr. kim. [applause] >>> thank you for your kind introduction. the curry economic institute is hon snored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partner than the edmund school of foreign services and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really i do do think that the 21st century will be seen as asia-pacific century. many of the growth will merge from the region and of course many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the perspective of asian integration and the security problems on the korean peninsula to name a few. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in the region will be critical
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
a week. christian science monitor once a week, "detroit news", cleveland plain, but "newsweek" saying we're just going to do it on-line that is happening it in the print world. not just in newspapers and magazines but obviously books, which is one of the questions why at some point there is at least the question mark where they will be able to continue publishing bound books. >> well, kind of come back though to socially what role books play. you know, sort of this cultural significance of the quote literary author, it really matters to a relatively small number of people. you know it's an elitist thing. there is popular fiction. there is serious nonfiction. you know, which is really in the same category as serious reporting of all kinds. >> you used this phrase elitist twice in this conversation watch. dow mean by that? >> what i mean is the notion by some group that their favorite activity is so important that it needs to be protected. >> what if it were defined differently as a group that says this is part of what you talked about earlier, of preserving the culture. >> i would saythat
. there was a very controversial position i took at the time. i am going to be driven by the science. i agree with what mr. gregg said. the natural resources defense council ranked two of the beaches among best in the country for two years in a row. >> do have any advice on how to deal with these issues in the state? >> one of the students is my daughter. she is interested in these issues. i think delaware is a tremendous place. we have beautiful places, a beautiful environment and we have to work hard to make sure we're protecting that. i think a great environment is a bonus in terms of economic development. gov. peterson past the coastal zone act. people thought that was an economic -- it was an anti-jobs. it turned out to be the opposite. because we have such a beautiful delaware bay, businesses want to be here. that is why we're fake -- focused on the bayshore initiative. one of the objections i have is the thing of the power plant in the coastal zone. the pollutants are sulfur trade we have done is we have waived the requirement to put that manufacturing facility in the coastal zone. we
. others say it is pretty unusual. i was wondering what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurrican
that comes from nih -- the national science foundation. i would take issue that the republic of texas is making it on their own. they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development sollars, which is fine. -- development dollars, which is fine. the benefit from the oil industry is a unique situation. we do not have that everywhere. texas' benefit from nasa, the national science foundation investment, and the national institutes of health. >> congressman gary wants me to ask you why obama did not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions in the auto bailout. >> that is an urban legend. we are working to help the unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw and others. but this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as other unions. there are many salaried folks who are saying this was the president picking the unions over the salary people. that is not true. there are other unions that did not make out -- it was a bankruptcy. it was a difficult decision. it is not true.
even the after with political reform. that our science the other element elements in national community they are getting weary of this conflict. the turks i think are a little weary right now. there've been some comments even from the obama administration, shifting from the manichaean view towards assad. so all of these scenarios don't present too much of a pretty picture, and, obviously, lead to more death and destruction in the near term but, unfortunately, there are no easy answers to this. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. we have two respondents. we have paul sullivan, professor of economics, national defense university as was agenda professor in the security studies program at georgetown university. will ask and become first and then lastly we'll have ambassador take the tooth, president and ceo of america-mideast education and training. spent i have not been more torn of the situation were longtime that the situation in syria. this is a serious business. now, when people mentioned soft power, i think there may be some of get the impression that this is having peace on
in electric auto and solar company we'll invest in energy science and research. to make discoveries that can actually change our energy world. and by 2020 we will achieve north american energy independence. [applause] we will make trade work for america. we'll open more markets for american agriculture and products and services and we'll findly -- finally hold accountable any nation that doesn't play by the rules. look, i'm going to stand up for the rights and interests of american workers and employers and we're going to grow jobs by making america the best place for job creatorsing for entrepreneurs, for small business. this will mean upkating and reshaping regulations to encourage growth by lowering tax rates while lowering deductions and bay making it clear from day one that unlike the current administration we like business. and the jobs that business creates. and timely, as we create more opportunity, we'll make sure that our citizens have the skills they need to succeed. training programs are going to be shaped by the states where people live and schools will put the interests of our
? climate change has not gotten talked-about rehab this whether in this science is overwhelming you don't see it on the nightly news to say we have to cover this war? one was the environment every time we tried to do a prime-time special meehan leonardo dicaprio interview president clinton and i was killed for it. we did the prime-time special he was the chairman of earth day i thought he would make an appearance be interviewed the president. that was the attempt. but we did more tears them coverage before 9/11. we did a prime-time special but the military said the biggest concern it is enacted of terrorism of. i wish we had done more. education is not covered in the depth that it should be. some of our difficult to do with television. >> host: how much pressure is there to do entertainment as news? lindsay lohan or the superficiality? to seem that journalism has gone down is there pressure what is the news? >> there was the disagreement with princess diana coverage after she died and peter said it was a terrible idea but then came around. it was a constant battle within myself and is a
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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